Gambling Rules & Regulations

Tasmanian Gambling Commission
80 Elizabeth Street
Hobart, Tasmania, 7000
Enquiries:         03 6233 6119
Fax:                  03 6234 3357
Email:               gaming@treasury.tas.gov.au
Website:           www.gaming.tas.gov.au

Raffles

The Tasmanian Gaming Commission publishes a comprehensive fact sheet for running a raffle, detailing the fundraising licensing obligations and conditions.

This Tasmanian Gambling Commission factsheet can be downloaded by clicking:

http://www.treasury.tas.gov.au/domino/dtf/dtf.nsf/LookupFiles/Rules-Conditions-Raffles.pdf/$file/Rules-Conditions-Raffles.pdf

Information contained in factsheet can be summarised as follows:

Is a permit required?

A permit is required, where the retail value of the prizes exceeds $5 000.

Once your permit is obtained, to conduct a raffle an Individual Activity Notification form must be completed and lodged at least 7 days prior to conducting the game.

A likeness, sketch or printers proof of the raffle tickets must be submitted with the form. The raffle ticket example must contain all of the information included on the “Raffle Ticket Sample”.

Rules of raffles

  • Raffle proceeds must be used not-for-profit organisation or a charitable purpose and not for the private gain or benefit of any person except by way of charity.
  • All ticket sellers must be made aware of the conditions applicable to the sale of tickets in the raffle.
  • A raffle must be drawn within six (6) months of receiving approval to conduct the raffle.
  • Where the total retail value of the prizes is less than $5 000, the total retail value of the prizes must equal at least twenty percent (20%) of the total income from ticket sales.
  • The price of each ticket must be the same value, however ticket bundling (for example sell tickets at $1.00 each or three for $2.00) is permitted for raffles where the total retail value of the prizes is under $1 000. Ticket prices should be clearly printed on the tickets and/or clearly indicated on any literature promoting the raffle and its prizes.
  • Cash is permitted as a prize, however the total of cash prizes for a raffle must not exceed $5 000. The Commission may approve spending money as part of a trip prize. The amount of the spending money must be stated on all tickets.
  • Where conditions apply to a prize a copy of the conditions must be provided in writing to ticket purchasers on request and this must be stated on the ticket where a permit is issued to conduct a raffle.
  • Children under the age of 13 must not sell tickets in any raffle.
  • Children under the age of 16 must not sell tickets in raffles in which the total retail value of prizes is more than $500.
  • Tickets in a raffle may only be purchased by individual persons who are aged 18 years or older.
  • Raffle tickets must not be sold “door to door”.
  • An independent person not associated with the organisation must draw the raffle at a venue which is accessible to the public.
  • No condition may be imposed that requires a winner of a prize to be present at the draw in order to claim the prize.
  • Raffle ticket butts must be drawn from a barrel or other large suitable container. There must be sufficient room in the barrel or container for the butts to be mixed freely. No other form of selecting prize winners may be used without prior approval from the Commission.
  • The method of the draw must allow each ticket in the draw a random and equal chance of being drawn. If there is more than one prize being offered, the first ticket drawn must win first prize and so on. First prize is defined as being the most valuable prize offered in the raffle. “Reverse Draw” raffles are prohibited. Approval by the Commission is necessary if any other means for determining prize winners is proposed.
  • The raffle may only be conducted with the written authority of the governing body of the community or charitable organisation to benefit from the raffle.

Raffles with a prize value exceeding $5 000

  • A minor gaming permit is required.
  • An individual activity notification must be lodged with the Commission at least seven (7) days prior to conducting the raffle.
  • The responsible person who applies for a minor gaming permit to conduct a raffle shall be issued with the permit and be held responsible for its proper conduct.
  • As a holder of a minor gaming permit there is a duty to comply with the conditions of raffles. The Gaming Control Act 1993 provides for a fine up to $6 500 for failure to do so.
  • No employees/office bearers of the organisation or their relatives* may purchase raffle tickets.
  • Each raffle ticket must contain all of the information as detailed on the “Raffle Ticket Sample” including the total number of tickets in the draw where the total retail value of the prizes exceeds $10 000.
  • All raffle ticket butts must show the purchaser’s name and contact details. Ticket sellers must ensure that sufficient information is obtained from the ticket purchaser to identify and locate the person to whom the ticket is sold.
  • All money from ticket sales must be received directly by the organisation and banked into a bank account operated by the organisation within two working days after it is received.
  • If the organisation uses a third party or marketing company to promote the raffle, this must be stated on each raffle ticket.
  • Any changes to the conduct of the raffle after the permit has been issued must first be approved by the Commission.
  • A proper record of the receipts and payments of the raffle must be kept for a period of seven years after the raffle has been drawn. The Commission may ask for this information.
  • The permit holder must ensure the following accurate records are kept:
  • The disposition of funds after the finalisation of the raffle;
  • All tickets which have been printed;
  • Details of the distribution of prizes; and
  • Bank statements clearly identifying all transactions related to the conduct of the raffle.
  • For raffles with a prize value in excess of $10 000 a detailed financial statement of receipts and payments resulting from the conduct of the raffle, certified by the auditor, must be submitted to the Commission within six (6) weeks of the drawing date of the raffle.
  • The financial statements must detail:
  • The number of tickets printed;
  • The number of tickets which are issued for sale;
  • The number of tickets (if any) which are returned unsold and subsequently reissued for sale;
  • The number of tickets which are sold by the time of drawing;
  • A reconciliation of the tickets printed, a reconciliation of the number of tickets issued, a reconciliation of the number of tickets sold with the money received from their sale and an explanation for any discrepancies; and
  • Steps taken to have missing tickets returned.

Calcutta Sweepstake

The Tasmanian Gaming Commission publishes a comprehensive fact sheet for running a Calcutta Sweepstake, detailing the fundraising licensing obligations and conditions.

This Tasmanian Gambling Commission fact-sheet can be downloaded by clicking:

http://www.treasury.tas.gov.au/domino/dtf/dtf.nsf/LookupFiles/Calcuttarules.pdf/$file/Calcuttarules.pdf

Information contained in factsheet can be summarised as follows:

Quick facts

• A minor gaming permit is required

• Maximum entry – $5.00 per ticket

• A maximum of 10% of gross proceeds may be retained as profit by the applicant organisation

• A calcutta may be conducted over a maximum period of 42 days

• It is an offence to sell a ticket or chance in a calcutta sweepstake to a person under eighteen years of age, or for such a person to purchase such a ticket or chance

Definition

A calcutta sweepstake is a combination of a lottery and an auction. Participants purchase a ticket in the draw for a contestant in a race or event.

At the completion of the draw, the successful tickets (“contestants”) are then auctioned. Only successful and unsuccessful ticket holders may bid for a contestant. Traditionally prizes of the stake are issued for first, second and third placed contestants.

Who is permitted to conduct a Calcutta

Permits for calcutta sweepstakes will only be granted if proceeds are used exclusively for the lawful purposes of a not-for-profit organisation or a charitable purpose and not for the private gain.

A minor gaming permit is required.

Participation in the Calcutta Sweepstake

Each participant must have a fair and equal chance of winning.The price of every ticket sold in a calcutta sweepstake must be the same. Participants purchase tickets for a maximum of $5.00 for the chance to ‘draw’ a contestant (usually) in a sporting event. All tickets are then placed in a random draw from which successful participants are matched with randomly drawn contestants in the sporting event. All sold tickets must be included in the draw.

The prizes must consists of all monies raised from the ticket sales and auction, less the amount retained by the minor gaming permit holder (maximum of 10% of gross proceeds may be retained as profit by the applicant organisation) and any monies paid to players who elect to take a percentage of the auction price of their participant.

The winners in a calcutta sweepstake are decided entirely or partly by chance, according to the result of the race or event.

When the draw is conducted on a separate day to the auction, the results of the draw are to be publicised widely to enable successful entrants the opportunity to participate in the auction.

The minor gaming permit holder is responsible for the proper conduct, including the financial control of the calcutta sweepstake.

It is an offence to sell a ticket or chance in a calcutta sweepstake to a person under the age of eighteen years.

How should the Calcutta Sweepstake be Advertised?

No restrictions are placed on advertising. However, all participants in a calcutta sweepstake should have the following rules or conditions of entry clearly brought to their attention:

• The time and place of the draw;

• How and when successful players are notified of the draw outcome and time and date;

• If a contestant is scratched from an event or race all monies are forfeited (ie. no refunds);

• How the prize pool is to be divided;

• How the winners are to be notified and how to collect prizes;

• That successful purchasers must pay for their contestants immediately following completion of the auction (no credit can be given); and

• How participants are to be told of the outcome of the calcutta.

This information must be displayed in a prominent position.

Records to be Retained

All records in relation to the calcutta sweepstake must be retained for a minimum of seven (7) years.

RULES:

Participants purchase a ticket in the draw for a contestant in a race or event.

Participants may purchase more than one ticket.

All tickets are to be placed in a random draw from which successful participants are matched with randomly drawn contestants.

Participants who have successfully obtained a contestant in the race or event, may elect to sell their interest in the contestant by electing to take 50% of the auction price and not participate any further in the calcutta sweepstake.

Participants must nominate whether they intend to sell or retain their interest in the contestant prior to the commencement of the auction.

Alternatively, the participant can elect to receive 50% of the relevant prize if the contestant is placed in the race or event.

Where the participant elects to retain their interest in the contestant, the highest bidder at auction is only required to pay 50% of the auction price. Accordingly the highest bidder is entitled only to 50% of the contestant with any prize winnings to be divided equally between the highest bidder and the participant electing to retain an interest.

Where a participant elects to bid for the contestant, if successful he/she only pays 50% of the auction price. If the contestant is placed, this would entitle the participant to receive 100% of the prize allocated to that place.

Only successful and unsuccessful ticket holders may bid for a contestant at auction.

Winning cannot be contingent upon being present for the draw.

If a person who has successfully drawn a contestant is not in attendance at the auction, that person’s full interest in the contestant will be sold on his/her behalf.

Joker Poker

The Tasmanian Gaming Commission publishes a comprehensive fact sheet for running a Trade Promotion.  A game of Joker Poker is only permitted in Tasmania if it is run as a Trade Promotion.

This Tasmanian Gambling Commission factsheet on running a trade promotion can be downloaded by clicking:

http://www.treasury.tas.gov.au/domino/dtf/dtf.nsf/LookupFiles/JokerJackpot.pdf/$file/JokerJackpot.pdf

Information contained in factsheet can be summarised as follows:

Conducting a trade promotion in Tasmania

A trade promotion is a mechanism used mainly to promote a business, where a prize is offered as an incentive for customers to buy goods and/or services. A trade promotion sometimes appears to be similar to a lottery, or a raffle. However, a trade promotion is not a lottery or a raffle.

Unlike a lottery or raffle, a trade promotion cannot have a cost of entry (except for the ordinary cost of purchasing the goods or services, which should be the normal retail price). For example, if you decided to conduct a trade promotion on beer, you would give the customer an entry into the trade promotion prize draw each time the customer bought a beer. You cannot raise the price of beer, or any other good or service, to cover the costs of running the trade promotion.

If you let a customer enter the trade promotion by any other means, such as paying to enter without buying goods and/or services, or by buying a raffle ticket, then the promotion is in all likelihood, a lottery. Lotteries are illegal unless they are specifically authorised by the Tasmanian Gaming Commission.

Significant fines can be applied for conducting an unauthorised lottery.

A legitimate trade promotion must follow these steps:

1. A customer may enter a trade promotion only by purchasing specified goods and/or services.

2. The goods and/or services must be sold at the regular retail price. There should be no cost to enter the trade promotion EXCEPT the regular purchase price of goods and/or services that are part of the promotion; and

3. The winner of the promotion must be determined by chance.

If any of these rules are broken, the trade promotion may actually be an unauthorised lottery.

It is not a trade promotion if there is a cost to enter that is separate from, or in addition to, purchasing a good and/or service.

Joker’s jackpot or joker poker

A Joker’s Jackpot (or Joker Poker) is a form of trade promotion. A Joker’s Jackpot is where a customer purchases goods and/or services that are part of the trade promotion. By making the purchase, the customer may enter into a primary draw. The winner of the primary draw is determined by chance. The winner of the primary draw may then participate in the major draw.

The major draw consists of the winner of the primary draw being offered a selection of playing cards. There is only one joker included in the deck, and this is the winning card. If the participant chooses the joker, they have won the major prize. If they do not choose the joker, the losing card is permanently removed from the selection of cards offered next time the major prize draw is conducted.

As cards are removed from the selection, the odds of choosing the joker increases, which serves as an incentive for people to participate in the trade promotion. In addition, the major prize may jackpot every time the joker is not picked. A Joker’s Jackpot trade promotion is legal if it is conducted in this way. If a Joker’s Jackpot is not conducted in this way, it may constitute an unauthorised lottery.

What not to do?

If you do any of the following things when conducting a Joker’s Jackpot you may be breaking the rules.

The customer can only enter the promotion by purchasing goods and/or services at the regular retail price. It is illegal to simply sell entry by itself.

A Joker poker draw must not be conducted without a joker in the selection of cards.

Bingo

The Tasmanian Gaming Commission publishes a comprehensive fact sheet for running a raffle, detailing the fundraising licensing obligations and conditions.

This Tasmanian Gambling Commission factsheet can be downloaded by clicking:

http://www.treasury.tas.gov.au/domino/dtf/dtf.nsf/LookupFiles/Rules-Conditions-Raffles.pdf/$file/Rules-Conditions-Raffles.pdf

Information contained in factsheet can be summarised as follows:

 Quick facts

  • A minor gaming permit is required.
  • No charge whatsoever may be made for admission
  • Goods are not permitted to be offered as prizes.
  • All cards used in a game shall be sold at the same price.
  • No person under the age of eighteen shall play bingo.
  • Jackpot games are limited to two (2) each session.

Who is permitted to conduct bingo

An individual or group of people may conduct by way of lottery the game known as bingo or a series of such games provided that the proceeds are used exclusively for the lawful purposes of a not-for-profit organisation or a charitable purpose and not for the private gain or benefit of any person except by way of charity.

A minor gaming permit is required.

As a holder of a minor gaming permit there is a duty to comply with conditions and rules of bingo. Contravention of the Gaming Control Act 1993 may result in disciplinary action.

Sale of cards

Every card sold in a game shall have fifteen numbers printed on its face or front.

All cards used in a game shall be sold at the same price and the price for a card shall not exceed 20 cents (with the exception of single sheet games as described in conditions 23 and 25).

Every card used in a game shall bear a serial number to identify the game being played, and the number shall be announced to players immediately before the commencement of each game.

Another identifying number (or numbers) shall be printed on each book or sheet of cards issued, to enable the number of cards sold during the course of the session to be calculated.

Payment of prizes

The winner is the first person/s to advise the caller (usually by calling out loudly “bingo”), that they have covered the required numbers from the draw. Should two (2) or more people cover the required numbers from the draw at the same time, all will be declared joint winners.

In the event of there being more than one winner in a game, the prize money shall be shared equally between the winners.

In the circumstance where a player has completed a card but has not noticed this fact until after another player (or players) has called “bingo” on a subsequent number, the prize for the particular game shall be divided equally between the players concerned.

At the conclusion of each game the numbers of the winning card will be called back and shall be checked by two unsuccessful players in the game.

A number is considered to have been drawn when it has been determined by random selection, either mechanically or manually. The number so drawn shall take precedence, in the event of a dispute between the number drawn and the number announced (either audibly or visually).

If a visual display is being used, the caller must still announce the number clearly before the following number is displayed.

No prize shall be awarded to any player in a game unless all the relevant numbers on the card held by him for that game have been properly called.

The prizes for all games in the session:

  • Shall be paid only from the receipts deriving from the session;
  • Shall not be less than fifty percent of the total gross proceeds derived from the session, and
  • Shall be paid in cash as soon as practicable after the conclusion of each game.
  • Goods are not permitted to be offered as prizes.

Jackpot conditions

“Jackpot” games of bingo are subject to the following conditions:

Jackpot games are limited to two each session;

  • The total prize for the first game of a jackpot series may be an amount not exceeding $300;
  • Each jackpot is not to increase by more than $50 per session;
  • If the jackpot pool reaches $2 000 for a game the pool must be distributed as prize money in or before the last game in a session; and
  • Jackpot games can be either:
  • A ‘Standard Jackpot’ where the game is limited to a stipulated number of calls commencing at 50 numbers called and increasing by one over the next one, two, three or four subsequent jackpot games until the prize is won; or
  • A ‘Rolling Jackpot’ game where the game is limited to and remains at a stipulated number of calls, usually 50 calls, until the prize is won.

Other General Conditions

  • No charge whatsoever may be made for admission to any session of bingo.
  • No person engaged in the conduct of any session of bingo shall be paid a wage, salary or commission for his services.
  • No person under the age of eighteen years shall play bingo, however, persons sixteen years or over may assist in the conduct of the game.
  • It is not permissible to offer any prize (cash or goods) or inducement of any kind that jackpots from one session to another, other than a recognised jackpot game.
  • Bingo may only be conducted on the dates or days and times shown on the minor gaming permit and individual activity notifications.

Records to be retained

The person to whom the permit has been issued shall be responsible for keeping accurate records of all the transactions of each bingo session and such records are to be retained for seven (7) years and may be inspected by any authorised officer of the Commission or any Police Officer.

Rules:

  • A game of bingo is the first person/s to complete their card from a random draw from a set of numbers 1 to 90 and advise the caller.
  • If two (2) of more players declare bingo on the same number, they share the prize as joint winners.
  • A player may play more than one card. Card(s) are purchased prior to commencement of play. Cards may be sold as books of 10 and 20.
  • If a player incorrectly declares himself or herself a winner, that player is permitted to continue to play the bingo game.
  • If an incorrect number is announced, that incorrect announcement, for the purpose of determining the winner of a bingo game, is taken not to have been made.

Versions of Bingo

Only one of the following versions may be played in a game of bingo:

Version 1:

The game is won by the first player to:

  • have all the numbers in the top horizontal line of numbers on his or her ticket announced by the caller; and
  • call “line” or “bingo” or make an audible noise or have another person call “line” or “bingo” on his or her behalf after the caller finishes calling the number but before the next number is called;

Version 2:

The game is won by the first player to:

  • have all the numbers in the middle horizontal line of numbers on his or her ticket announced by the caller; and
  • call “line” or “bingo” or make an audible noise or have another person call “line” or “bingo” on his or her behalf after the caller finishes calling the number but before the next number is called;

Version 3:

The game is won by the first player to:

  • have all the numbers in the bottom horizontal line of numbers on his or her ticket announced by the caller; and
  • call “line” or “bingo” or make an audible noise or have another person call “line” or “bingo” on his or her behalf after the caller finishes calling the number but before the next number is called;

Version 4:

The game is won by the first player to:

  • have all the numbers on his or her ticket announced by the caller; and
  • call “line” or “bingo” or make an audible noise or have another person call “line” or “bingo” on his or her behalf after the caller finishes calling the number but before the next number is called;

Version 5:

The game is won by the first player to:

  • have all the numbers on any one of the three horizontal lines on his or her ticket announced by the caller; and
  • call “line” or “bingo” or make an audible noise or have another person call “line” or “bingo” on his or her behalf after the caller finishes calling the number but before the next number is called.

Duties of the caller and the supervisor

A person must be appointed a caller and another person must be appointed as supervisor for each bingo game.

  • The caller and the supervisor must not participate as players during the bingo game.
  • The caller must announce at the start of the bingo game which of the versions specified in rule six (6) will be played.
  • The caller must announce, at the start of the bingo game and at the callback, the serial number printed on the back of the card relating to each individual game.
  • The caller must randomly select numbers from:
  • A random number generator; or
  • A receptacle containing 90 balls numbered consecutively from 1 to 90; and
  • Must announce each selected number.
  • If numbers are being selected from a receptacle as specified the selected numbered ball must be handed to the supervisor immediately.
  • The supervisor must:
  • Display a visual representation of each selected number in such a way that it is clearly visible to all players until the end of the game; and
  • If numbers are being selected from a receptacle, check that the number has been correctly announced by the caller and place it on a rack which is clearly visible to all players until the end of the game; and
  • Determine the winner of the bingo game by collecting the winning bingo ticket from each player who has declared himself or herself to be a winner; and
  • Confirm the serial number and ticket book number (if any), and that the ticket was sold or played in the relevant game; and
  • Count back the numbers on the ticket against the numbers called, in the presence of an independent player.
  • If the caller or the supervisor becomes aware that an error has been made in the calling or display of numbers, he or she must immediately make an announcement correcting the error.

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